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Archive for the tag “history”

AMERICAN HISTORY, WHO CARES ANYMORE?

 One evening a grandson was talking to his grandfather about current events.
A grandson asked his grandfather what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general..

Stay with this — the answer is at the end. 

It may blow you away.
The Grandfather replied, “Well, let me think a minute, I was born before:
 television
 penicillin
 polio shots
 frozen foods
 Xerox
 contact lenses
 Frisbees and
 the pill
 
There were no: 
 credit cards
 laser beams or
 ball-point pens
Man had not invented :
 pantyhose
 air conditioners
 dishwashers
 clothes dryers
 and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air and
 space travel was only in Flash Gordon books.
Your Grandmother and I got married first,… and then lived together..
 
Every family had a father and a mother. Until I was 25, I called every woman older than me, “maam”. And after I turned 25, I still called policemen and every man with a title, “Sir.
 
We were before gay-rights, computer-dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.
 
Our lives were governed by the Bible, good judgment, and common sense. We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.
 
Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege… We thought fast food was eating half a biscuit while running to catch the school bus.
 
Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins.
 
Draft dodgers were those who closed front doors as the evening breeze started.
 
Time-sharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends-not purchasing condominiums.
 
We never heard of FM radios, tape decks, CD’s, electric typewriters, yogurt, or guys wearing earrings.
 
We listened to Big Bands, Jack Benny, and the President’s speeches on our radios. And I don’t ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey.
 
If you saw anything with ‘Made in Japan ‘ on it, it was junk.
 
The term ‘making out’ referred to how you did on your school exam….
 
Pizza Hut, McDonald’s, and instant coffee were unheard of.
We had 5 &10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for 5 and 10 cents. Ice-cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel. And if you didn’t want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and 2 postcards.
 
You could buy a new Ford Coupe for $600, … but who could afford one? Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon.
 
In my day:
 “grass” was mowed,
 “coke” was a cold drink,
 “pot” was something your mother cooked in and
 “rock music” was your grandmother’s lullaby.
 “Aids” were helpers in the Principal’s office,
 “chip” meant a piece of wood,
 “hardware” was found in a hardware store and
 “software” wasn’t even a word.
 
And we were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby.
 
No wonder people call us “old and confused” and say there is a generation gap.
 
How old do you think I am?
 
I bet you have this old man in mind….you are in for a shock!
 
Read on to see — pretty scary if you think about it and pretty sad at the same time .
 
Are you ready ?????
This man would be only 70 years old today.  ANON
Most people are aware that this old man will be 87 in August and these facts were aimed at those born in 1947. I graduated from high school at 16, joined the US Navy reserve at 17 all in 1947. If someone compiled for 1930, the year I was born, it would add many more surprises for my family of 43 would be amazed. much of a Doctor’s work today was performed by a pharmacist. I have no memory of ever going to a Doctor until I was 15. I was born at home as having a baby was not a hospital event. My brother was born ia a hospital in 1933. 
Now that History is not required in schools these facts will slowly disappear and my great grand children will never know what life was like when I was their age and likely never know who I was. Man has progressed but I feel that History should be a required subject in schools. Sadly people, including my own family will never believe what life was like when Americans actually liked each other. No one in the family, except my brother and I, has ever served in the military that we both volunteered for. This void is why we have no respect or discipline in the youth anymore. Schools raise the children as both parents work in most families. My thanks to the person who wrote the factual History. I would add the things that have occurred before 1947 but no one, including my family, will read or comment on this. American’s today have no time to even care what happened in the past. My hope is more than three people read this and at least one has a comment
I HOPE THIS WALK THROUGH RECENT HISTORY GIVES YOU SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT… SHARE THIS WITH ALL OF YOUR  OLD FRIENDS, THE YOUNG ONES WILL NEVER BELIEVE IT OR CARE.
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A LIFE STORY!

My great friend and golfing buddy sent this to me and I suppose as he is 80 and I am 85 it may have had a bigger impact as my father was also born in 1902 and also a newspaper man but he was different as he drove too long and I had to confiscate his car keys when he was just 77 for everyone’s safety. This brought back some great memories of growing up in this same era. I hope at least, but doubt that even my family will read this and someday tell my grandkids about my unusual life. So much is lost because we don’t take time to record family history except with pictures. The stories are the value of comparing eras and whether your life was better than your ancestors.

Humor used to be a way of life until the government started regulating our lives and reducing our freedoms. The current move to a Socialists Democracy will likely happen and future Americans will not even believe what freedom was/ Watching this transition including Progressive-Liberals in my own family have been the saddest memory of my life. Thanks ED Johnson for making my day. I hope it makes others remember how lucky we were to have lived during the best days in the history of America.  C Brewer

This nice piece by Michael Gartner, editor of newspapers large and small and president of NBC News. In 1997 he won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing. It is well worth reading. A few good chuckles are guaranteed.

My father never drove a car. Well, that’s not quite right. I should say I never saw him drive a car. He quit driving in 1927, when he was 25 years old, and the last car he drove was a 1926 Whippet.

“In those days,” he told me when he was in his 90s, “to drive a car you had to do things with your hands, and do things with your feet, and look every which way, and I decided you could walk through life and enjoy it or drive through life and miss it.” At which point my mother, a sometimes salty Irishwoman, chimed in:”Oh, baloney, he hit a horse!!” “Well,” my father said, “there was that, too.”

So my brother and I grew up in a household without a car. The neighbors all had cars — the Kollingses next door had a green 1941 Dodge, the VanLaninghams across the street a gray 1936 Plymouth, the Hopsons two doors down a black 1941 Ford — but we had none.

My father, a newspaperman in Des Moines, would take the streetcar to work and, often as not, walk the 3 miles home. If he took the streetcar home, my mother and brother and I would walk the three blocks to the streetcar stop, meet him and walk home together.

My brother, David, was born in 1935, and I was born in 1938, and sometimes, at dinner, we’d ask how come all the neighbors had cars but we had none. “No one in the family drives,” my mother would explain, and that was that.
It was as if he wasn’t sure which one of us would turn 16 first. But, sure enough, my brother turned 16 before I did, so in 1951 my parents bought a used 1950 Chevrolet from a friend who ran the parts department at a ChevBut, sometimes, my father would say, “But as soon as one of you boys turns 16, we’ll get one.”y dealership downtown. It was a four-door, white model, stick shift, fender skirts, loaded with everything, and, since my parents didn’t drive, it more or less became my brother’s car. Having a car but not being able to drive didn’t bother my father, but it didn’t make sense to my mother.

So in 1952, when she was 43 years old, she asked a friend to teach her to drive. She learned in a nearby cemetery, the place where I learned to drive the following year and where, a generation later, I took my two sons to practice driving. The cemetery probably was my father’s idea. “Who can your mother hurt in the cemetery?” I remember him saying more than once.

For the next 45 years or so, until she was 90, my mother was the driver in the family. Neither she nor my father had any sense of direction, but he loaded up on maps — though they seldom left the city limits — and appointed himself navigator. It seemed to work. Still, they both continued to walk a lot. My mother was a devout Catholic, and my father an equally devout agnostic, an arrangement that didn’t seem to bother either of them through their 75 years 
of marriage. (Yes, 75 years, and they were deeply in love the entire time.)

He retired when he was 70, and nearly every morning for the next 20 years or so, he would walk with her the mile to St. Augustine’s Church. She would walk down and sit in the front pew, and he would wait in the back until he saw which of the parish’s two priests was on duty that morning. If it was the pastor, my father then would go out and take a 2-mile walk, meeting my mother at the end of the service and walking her home.

If it was the assistant pastor, he’d take just a 1-mile walk and then head back to the church. He called the priests “Father Fast” and “Father Slow.”

After he retired, my father almost always accompanied my mother whenever she drove anywhere, even if he had no reason to go along. If she were going to the beauty parlor, he’d sit in the car and read, or go take a stroll or, if it was summer, have her keep the engine running so he could listen to the Cubs game on the radio. 

In the evening, then, when I’d stop by, he’d explain: “The Cubs lost again. The millionaire on second base made a bad throw to the millionaire on first base, so the multimillionaire on third base scored.”

If she were going to the grocery store, he would go along to carry the bags out — and to make sure she loaded up on ice cream. As I said, he was always the navigator, and once, when he was 95 and she was 88 and still driving, he said to me, “Do you want to know the secret of a long life?”

“I guess so,” I said, knowing it probably would be something bizarre.

“No left turns,” he said.

“What?” I asked.

“No left turns,” he repeated. “Several years ago, your mother and I read an article that said most accidents that old people are in happen when they turn left in front of oncoming traffic.

As you get older, your eyesight worsens, and you can lose your depth perception, it said. So your mother and I decided never again to make a left turn.”

“What?” I said again.

“No left turns,” he said. “Think about it.. Three rights are the same as a left, and that’s a lot safer. So we always make three rights..”


“You’re kidding!” I said, and I turned to my mother for support.

“No,” she said, “your father is right. We make three rights. It works.” But then she added: “Except when your father loses count.”

I was driving at the time, and I almost drove off the road as I started laughing.

“Loses count?” I asked.

“Yes,” my father admitted, “that sometimes happens. But it’s not a problem. You just make seven rights, and you’re okay again.”

I couldn’t resist. “Do you ever go for 11?” I asked.

“No,” he said ” If we miss it at seven, we just come home and call it a bad day. Besides, nothing in life is so important it can’t be put off another day or another week.”
My mother was never in an accident, but one evening she handed me her car keys and said she had decided to quit driving. That was in 1999, when she was 90.

She lived four more years, until 2003. My father died the next year, at 102. They both died in the bungalow they had moved into in 1937 and bought a few years later for $3,000. 

(Sixty years later, my brother and I paid $8,000 to have a shower put in the tiny bathroom — the house had never had one. My father would have died then and there if he knew the shower cost nearly three times what he paid for the house.)

He continued to walk daily — he had me get him a treadmill when he was 101 because he was afraid he’d fall on the icy sidewalks but wanted to keep exercising — and he was of sound mind and sound body until the moment he died.

One September afternoon in 2004, he and my son went with me when I had to give a talk in a neighboring town, and it was clear to all three of us that he was wearing out, though we had the usual wide-ranging conversation about politics and newspapers and things in the news.

A few weeks earlier, he had told my son, “You know, Mike, the first hundred years are a lot easier than the second hundred.” At one point in our drive that Saturday, he said, “You know, I’m probably not going to live much longer.” “You’re probably right,” I said.

“Why would you say that?” He countered, somewhat irritated. “Because you’re 102 years old,” I said. “Yes,” he said, “you’re right.” He stayed in bed all the next day.

That night, I suggested to my son and daughter that we sit up with him through the night. He appreciated it, he said, though at one point, apparently seeing us look gloomy, he said: “I would like to make an announcement. No one in this room is dead yet” An hour or so later, he spoke his last words:

“I want you to know,” he said, clearly and lucidly, “that I am in no pain. I am very comfortable. And I have had as happy a life as anyone on this earth could ever have.” A short time later, he died.

I miss him a lot, and I think about him a lot. I’ve wondered now and then how it was that my family and I were so lucky that he lived so long. I can’t figure out if it was because he walked through life, or because he quit taking left turns.” Life is too short to wake up with regrets. 

So love the people who treat you right. Forget about the one’s who don’t. Believe everything happens for a reason. If you get a chance, take it & if it changes your life, let it. Nobody said life would be easy, they just promised it would most likely be worth it.”

 

ENJOY LIFE NOW – IT HAS AN EXPIRATION DATE!

 

I can’t express my delight in reading this article as it made me remember some of the most unusual events of my life that I doubt my great grand children will ever know or really care. I am lucky to have lived longer than any male in both sides of my family buy I’ll never make 102 for sure. Please share this with as many Americans as possible. CB

THE BIBLE

This interesting information about the Bible was sent to me by my friend Wally Kittman. I am fascinated by the facts presented and decided to interrupt my work reading and reporting about the constant screw ups by our corrupt Congress and our leaderless President and publish this on Mothers Day. I hope this is profound enough to encourage at least one person who reads this to accept this challenge.

C Brewer May 12, 2013

During a question and answer session at a recent speakingengagement, a university student asked the speaker, “Why do you believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God?”

Now this is a very interesting question, and probably one of the most important questions any Christian could as themselves. What is so special, so unique about the Bible that Christians believe it is literally the inspired word of God?

In answering this student’s question, he encouraged him to consider the following facts about the Bible.

First, the Bible is not just one single book. This is a more common misconception than many people realize, especially with people who do not come from a Judeo-Christian background. Rather than being a single book, the Bible is actually a collection of 66 books, which is called the canon of scriptures. These 66 books contain a variety of genres: history, poetry, prophecy, wisdom literature, letters, and apocalyptic, just to name a few.

Second, these 66 books were written by 40 different authors. These authors came from a variety of backgrounds: shepherds, fishermen, doctors, kings, prophets, and others. And most of these authors never knew one another personally.

Third, these 66 books were written over a period of 1,500 years. Yet again, this is another reminder that many of these authors never knew or collaborated with one another in writing these books.

Fourth, the 66 books of the Bible were written in 3 different languages. In the Bible we have books that were written in the ancient languages of Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic; a reflection of the historical and cultural circumstances in which each of these books were written.

And finally, these 66 books were written on 3 different continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Once again, this is a testament to the varied historical and cultural circumstances of God’s people.

Think about the above realities: 66 books, written by 40 different authors, over 1,500 years, in 3 different languages, on 3 different continents. What’s more, this collection of books shares a common storyline – the creation, fall, and redemption of God’s people; a common theme – God’s universal love for all of humanity; and a common message – salvation is available to all who repent of their sins and commit to following God with all of their heart, soul, mind and strength.

In addition to sharing these commonalities, these 66 books contain no historical errors or contradictions. God’s word truly is an amazing collection of writings!

After he had shared the above facts with this student, he offered him the following challenge. “If you do not believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God, if you do not believe that the Bible is of a supernatural origin, then I challenge you to a test.  I challenge you to go to any library in the world. You can choose any library you like.

Find 66 books which match the characteristics of the 66 books in the Bible. You must choose 66 books, written by 40 different authors, over 1,500 years, in 3 different languages, written on 3 different continents. However, they must share a common storyline, a common theme, and a common message, with no historical errors or contradictions.” He went on to say, “If you can produce such a collection of books, I will admit that the Bible is not the inspired word of God.”

The student’s reply was almost instantaneous, he emphatically stated, “But that’s impossible!”

It truly is impossible, for any collection of human writings. However, the Bible passes this test. The Bible contains 66 books, written by 40 different authors, over 1,500 years, in 3 different languages, on 3 different continents, with no historical errors or contradictions. The entire Bible, from Genesis to Revelation, bears the mark of Divine inspiration.

The next time you encounter someone who asks you why you believe the Bible is the inspired word of God, try sharing this challenge with them. Better yet, don’t wait until you’re asked, just go ahead and share this challenge with a friend today. You don’t even have to mention the Bible up front, just ask them if they think it would be realistic to assemble such a collection of books. After they say, “But that’s impossible!” you’ve got a ready-made opportunity for sharing the truth of God’s word with somebody!

ANON

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER

My children and grandchildren will never know what life was like when I was a boy. Other seniors share the same memories and few take the time to share their primitive lives with their heirs, I do. This brought back two fond memories to share. The only telephones my grandparents ever had when I was a boy and today’s lack of love and patience with each other. Thanks Peter again, C Brewer.

THE OLDPHONE ON THE WALL…. HELLO (A Story)

When I was a young boy, my father had one of the first telephones in our neighborhood…. I remember the polished old case fastened to the wall. The shiny receiver hung on the side of the box. I was too little to reach the telephone, but used to listen with fascination when my mother talked to it.

Then I discovered that somewhere inside the wonderful device lived an amazing person. Her name was “Information Please” and there was nothing she did not know. Information Please could supply anyone’s number and the correct time.

My personal experience with the genie-in-a-bottle came one day while my mother was visiting a neighbor. Amusing myself at the tool bench in the basement, I whacked my finger with a hammer. The pain was terrible but there seemed no point in crying because there was no one home to give sympathy. I walked around the house sucking my throbbing finger, finally arriving at the stairway.

The telephone! Quickly, I ran for the footstool in the parlor and dragged it to the landing. Climbing up, I unhooked the receiver in the parlor and held it to my ear. “Information please,” I said into the mouthpiece just above my head.

A click or two and a small clear voice spoke into my ear. “Information,” “I hurt my finger…” I wailed into the phone the tears came readily enough now that I had an audience.

“Isn’t your mother home?” came the question. “Nobody’s home but me,” I blubbered. “Are you bleeding?” the voice asked. “No,” I replied. “I hit my finger with the hammer and it hurts.” “Can you open the icebox?” she asked. I said I could.

“Then chip off a little bit of ice and hold it to your finger,” said the voice. After that, I called “Information Please” for everything. I asked her for help with my geography and she told me where Philadelphia was. She helped me with my math.

She told me my pet chipmunk that I had caught in the park just the day before would eat fruit and nuts. Then, there was the time Petey, our pet canary, died… I called “Information Please,” and told her the sad story. She listened, and then said things grown-ups say to soothe a child. But I was not consoled. I asked her, “Why is it that birds should sing so beautifully and bring joy to all families, only to end up as a heap of feathers on the bottom of a cage?” She must have sensed my deep concern, for she said quietly, “Wayne, always remember that there are other worlds to sing in.”

Somehow I felt better.

Another day I was on the telephone, “Information Please.” “Information,” said in the now familiar voice. “How do I spell fix?” I asked. All this took place in a small town in the Pacific Northwest.

When I was nine years old, we moved across the country to Boston. I missed my friend very much. “Information Please” belonged in that old wooden box back home and I somehow never thought of trying the shiny new phone that sat on the table in the hall. As I grew into my teens, the memories of those childhood conversations never really left me.

Often, in moments of doubt and perplexity I would recall the serene sense of security I had then. I appreciated now how patient, understanding and kind she was to have spent her time on a little boy.

A few years later, on my way west to college, my plane put down in Seattle. I had about a half-hour or so between planes. I spent 15 minutes or so on the phone with my sister, who lived there now. Then without thinking what I was doing, I dialed my hometown operator and said, “Information Please.”

Miraculously, I heard the small, clear voice I knew so well. “Information,” I hadn’t planned this, but I heard myself saying, “Could you please tell me how to spell fix?” There was a long pause. Then came the soft spoken answer, “I guess your finger must have healed by now.” I laughed, “So it’s really you,” I said. “I wonder if you have any idea how much you meant to me during that time?”

I wonder,” she said, “if you know how much your calls meant to me. I never had any children and I used to look forward to your calls.” I told her how often I had thought of her over the years and I asked if I could call her again when I came back to visit my sister. “Please do”, she said. “Just ask for Sally.”

Three months later I was back in Seattle… A different voice answered, “Information.” I asked for Sally. “Are you a friend?” she said. “Yes, a very old friend,” I answered. “I’m sorry to have to tell you this, she said. Sally had been working part time the last few years because she was sick. She died five weeks ago.”

Before I could hang up, she said, “Wait a minute, did you say your name was Wayne?” “Yes.” I answered. “Well, Sally left a message for you. She wrote it down in case you called. Let me read it to you. “The note said, “Tell him there are other worlds to sing in. He’ll know what I mean. “I thanked her and hung up. I knew what Sally meant.

Never underestimate the impression you may make on others. Whose life have you touched today? Why not pass this on? I just did…..Lifting you on eagle’s wings. May you find the joy and peace you long for! Life is a journey… NOT a guided tour. I loved this story and just had to pass it on.

I hope you enjoy it and pass it on too.    

SAYINGS YOU DON’T HEAR ANYMORE.

I doubt most people still alive ever heard them!

Be sure to refill the ice trays, we’re going to have company.

Watch for the postman, I want to get this letter in the mail today.

Quit slamming the screen door when you go out!

Be sure and pull the windows down when you leave, it looks like a shower is coming up.

Don’t forget to wind the clock before you go to bed.

Wash your feet before you go to bed, you’ve been playing outside all day barefooted.

Why can’t you remember to roll up your britches legs? Getting them caught in the bicycle chain so many times is tearing them up.

You have torn the knees out of that pair of pants so many times there is nothing left to put a patch on.

Don’t you go outside with your school clothes on!

Go comb your hair; it looks like the rats have nested in it all night.

Be sure and pour the cream off the top of the milk when you open the new bottle.

Take that empty bottle to the store with you so you won’t have to pay a deposit on another one.

Put a dish towel over the cake so the flies won’t get on it.

Quit jumping on the floor! I have a cake in the oven and you are going to make it fall if you don’t quit!

Put your shirt tail in, everyone will think you are an orphan.

Open the back door and see if we can get a breeze through here, it is getting hot.

You can walk to the store; it won’t hurt you to get some exercise.

Sit closer to the radio; don’t turn it up so loud.

If you pull that stunt again, I am going to wear you out!

Don’t lose that button; I won’t be able to sew it back on.

Wash under your neck before you come to the table, you have beads of dirt and sweat all under there.

Get out from under the sewing machine; pumping it messes up the thread!

Here, take these old magazines to the toilet with you when you go, we are almost out of paper out there.

Go out to the well and draw a bucket of water so I can wash dishes.  

No! I don’t have 10 cents for you to go to the show. Do you think money grows on trees?

Eat that liver; it’ll make you big and strong like your daddy.

That dog is NOT coming in this house! I don’t care how cold it is out there, dogs don’t stay in the house.

Sit still! I’m trying to get your hair cut straight and you keep moving and it is all messed up.

Hush your mouth! I don’t want to hear words like Dad Gummit! I’ll wash your mouth out with soap!

It is time for your system to be cleaned out. I am going to give you a dose of “3S” Tonic tonight.

If you get a spanking in school and I find out about it, you’ll get another one when you get home.

Quit crossing your eyes! They will get stuck that way!

Soak your foot in this pan of kerosene so that bad cut won’t get infected. I jumped off a fence once and a rusty nail went completely through my foot. Kerosene was the treatment on my gauze wrapped foot. CB

Eat everything on your plate; those children in China are starving.

It’s: ‘Yes Ma’am!’ and ‘No Ma’am!’ to me, young man, and don’t you forget it!

Hurry up and finish drying the dishes so we can go “ketch sum lightnin bugs and pit ’em in a jar”. (my brothers line)

Y’all come back now, ya hear.

I truly regret that some of you young folks missed hearing these rules like I did. I heard 95% of these from my mother, brother, friends and grandmothers before I joined the Navy at 17.

Someday I will write what I learned in a hurry in the Navy. With our new society in place it may not be X-rated much longer.

Unless they are at least 75, I doubt that anyone I send this to will believe I heard these words?

C Brewer

WISDOM

You may have seen this before, I hope you enjoy the story again.  CB

HI HANDSOME, MY NAME IS ROSE

The first day of school our professor introduced himself and challenged us to get to know someone we didn’t already know. I stood up to look around when a gentle hand touched my shoulder.

I turned around to find a wrinkled, little old lady beaming up at me with a smile that lit up her entire being.

She said, ‘Hi handsome. My name is Rose. I’m eighty-seven years old. Can I give you a hug?’

I laughed and enthusiastically responded, ‘Of course you may!’ and she gave me a giant squeeze..

‘Why are you in college at such a young, innocent age?’ I asked.

She jokingly replied, ‘I’m here to meet a rich husband, get married, and have a couple of kids…’

‘No seriously,’ I asked. I was curious what may have motivated her to be taking on this challenge at her age.

‘I always dreamed of having a college education and now I’m getting one!’ she told me.

After class we walked to the student union building and shared a chocolate milkshake.

We became instant friends. Every day for the next three months we would leave class together and talk nonstop. I was always mesmerized listening to this ‘time machine’ as she shared her wisdom and experience with me..

Over the course of the year, Rose became a campus icon and she easily made friends wherever she went. She loved to dress up and she reveled in the attention bestowed upon her from the other students. She was living it up.

At the end of the semester we invited Rose to speak at our football banquet. I’ll never forget what she taught us. She was introduced and stepped up to the podium. As she began to deliver her prepared speech, she dropped her three by five cards on the floor.

Frustrated and a little embarrassed she leaned into the microphone and simply said, ‘I’m sorry I’m so jittery. I gave up beer for Lent and this whiskey is killing me! I’ll never get my speech back in order so let me just tell you what I know.’

As we laughed she cleared her throat and began, ‘ We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing.

There are only four secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success. You have to laugh and find humor every day. You’ve got to have a dream. When you lose your dreams, you die.

We have so many people walking around who are dead and don’t even know it!

There is a huge difference between growing older and growing up.

If you are nineteen years old and lie in bed for one full year and don’t do one productive thing, you will turn twenty years old. If I am eighty-seven years old and stay in bed for a year and never do anything I will turn eighty-eight.

Anybody! Can grow older. That doesn’t take any talent or ability. The idea is to grow up by always finding opportunity in change. Have no regrets.

The elderly usually don’t have regrets for what we did, but rather for things we did not do. The only people who fear death are those with regrets..’

She concluded her speech by courageously singing ‘The Rose.’

She challenged each of us to study the lyrics and live them out in our daily lives. At the year’s end Rose finished the college degree she had begun all those months ago.

One week after graduation Rose died peacefully in her sleep.

Over two thousand college students attended her funeral in tribute to the wonderful woman who taught by example that it’s never too late to be all you can possibly be.

When you finish reading this, please send this peaceful word of advice to your friends and family, they’ll really enjoy it!

REMEMBER, GROWING OLDER IS MANDATORY. GROWING UP IS OPTIONAL. We make a Living by what we get. We make a Life by what we give.

God promises a safe landing, not a calm passage. If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.

‘Good friends are like stars….. …….You don’t always see them, but you know they are always there.’

I have had a terrible day in my life today and my old friend Bob McGraw sent me this message. It did not reveal the author and I did not check to see if it was true. Whoever did write this would not be offended with me posting this on the blog immediately and I really do not care if it was true. It helped me realize several things, the most significant being, age always produces wisdom. Unfortunately today, most people do not even desire history or wisdom that is disappearing every day. Please share this with your friends, I just did.   C Brewer

“GOD SAVE AMERICA” 

DEMOCRACY – HISTORICAL FACTS!

This could happen in the next five years. There is no doubt in any sane persons’ mind that a Democracy is the objective of Obama, all Congressional democrats and even the Progressive republicans. The objective began over 100 years ago but like the record for spending money by Obama is at warp speed, so is the race to wreck our Constitution. They can lie, distort, slant and use race and prosperity to buy votes but all of the people are not dependent on handouts or  sell their souls for eternal welfare. Why people desire to lose their freedoms is unbelievable. How can any American forget the millions that have died to protect our Republic so they can live off the hard work of others? Do you realize that Obama can and will get Eric Holder, an admitted racist, a lifetime job on the Surpreme Court. Scares me, how about you?    C Brewer 

FACTS ARE FACTS

In 1887 Alexander Tyler, a Scottish history professor at the University of Edinburgh, had this to say about the fall of the Athenian Republic some 2,000 years prior:

“A democracy is always temporary in nature; it simply cannot exist as a permanent form of government.   A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover that they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury.

From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates who promise the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will finally

Collapse over loose fiscal policy, (which is) always followed by a dictatorship.”

“The average age of the world’s greatest civilizations from the beginning of history, has been about 200 years.  During those 200 years, these nations always progressed through the following sequence:

From bondage to spiritual faith;

From spiritual faith to great courage;

From courage to liberty; 

From liberty to abundance;

From complacency to apathy;

From apathy to dependence;

From dependence back into bondage.

The Obituary follows:

Born 1776, Died 2012 it doesn’t hurt to read this several times.         

FACTS CLOSER TO HOME

Professor Joseph Olson of Hamline University School of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota, points out some interesting facts concerning the last Presidential election:

Number of States won by:  Obama: 19                McCain: 29

Sq. miles won by:  Obama: 580,000        McCain: 2,427,000 

Counties won by:    Obama: 127 million McCain: 143 million

Murder rate per 100,000 residents in counties won by: Obama: 13.2    McCain: 2.1 

Professor Olson adds: “In aggregate, the map of the territory McCain won was mostly the land owned by the taxpaying citizens of the country.

Obama territory mostly encompassed those citizens living in low income tenements and living off various forms of government welfare…”

Olson believes the United States is now somewhere between the “complacency and apathy” phase of Professor Tyler’s definition of democracy, with some forty percent of the nation’s population already having reached the “governmental dependency” phase.

If Congress grants amnesty and citizenship to twenty million criminal invaders called illegals – and they vote – then we can say goodbye to the USA in fewer than five years. 

If you want a Democracy, then delete this message.

If you are not, then pass this along to help everyone realize just how much is at stake, knowing that apathy is the greatest danger to our freedom.

This is scary. Of course we are not a democracy, we are a Constitutional Republic. Of course we know that Obama and many others pay little attention to The Constitution.

There couldn’t be more at stake than on Nov 2012.

If you are as concerned as I am please pass this along.

Thanks Doc

EDUCATION TEXAS- A LOCAL ADVANTAGE?

For those who have children or grand children in K-12 schools, let me encourage you to find out if your if this described advantage exist where you live. It is obvious to me that the Texas Legislature uses politics to provide educational variables to pacify themselves and the appointed and elected Boards to favor certain school districts. Nationally the US Department of Education uses 90% of their billions to provide social justice for the minorities and aliens. Just read the itemized 92 page budget if you doubt my words. If the states and the federal governments would admit that a local program like the one described below would find the right path for aligning children’s capability with a mixture of academics and vocational programs necessary to prepare them for their place in society. We may all be created equally but we all do not fit into society equally. It is time for the people to stop this waste of money and demand change. CB

Article

“First let me apologize to Dr. Lana Comeaux, whose name I misspelled in the last article. I have lived in Sabine county, very close to Louisiana, for nearly 20 years. When Dr. Pearson suggested I meet Ms. Como, my age drove me to associate the name to Perry when I took notes.”

I had the pleasure to visit with Dr. Comeaux on Monday April 11th at the Sabine Area Career Center in Pineland, Texas. I had no conception of what a great advantage was available to the citizens of Sabine and San Augustine counties.

The center has several specialized classrooms to conduct classes and a welding facility with modern equipment and seven individually vented weld stations. The computer classroom is well equipped and is available for students use in searching the internet for assignments. Classrooms are available to permit students to participate and interact by video with some specialty classes being conducted at Angelina College in Lufkin.

The Career Center also has a large meeting room that is available for community meetings and special events. Currently this room is utilized for programs like Dance, Taekwondo, Photography, Flower Arranging and Computer classes. Another program available is support meetings for parents with autistic children.

In addition to the Angelina campus, some of the classes are conducted at Hemphill ISD and Jasper ISD where science labs or other specialty facilities exist. I have another meeting scheduled this April 21st with Dr. Pearson and Dr. Comeaux to view the Hemphill laboratories and other specialized facilities.

Some of the two year college credit courses are; English, World History, US History, Texas History, Sociology, Algebra, Chemistry, Biology etc. The Career Center also provides Community Service Programs that include; Phlebotomy, Certified Nurse Asst., Medical Asst., GED Preparation, and Welding. Future planning includes courses for EMT, LVN, Police and Fire careers, Automotive and A/C & Repair.

All of the programs are available to students at Hemphill, West Sabine, Brookland, Broadus and San Augustine school districts.

Citizens of the area are fortunate to have this facility. It does require the five school districts to work closely with Dr. Comeaux. This includes a student’s needs assessment and scheduling classes to permit the students to be able to take the Angelina programs. Each of the five school districts provide either the superintendent or a principal to serve on the on the Board of Directors.

The program is totally funded by grants, donations and private foundations. Currently the Beaumont and TLL Foundations provide significant funding for the Center. No state or local taxes are appropriated for the center. This is an unusual advantage for both the students and parents of Sabine and San Augustine counties.

A student can take up to twenty classes which can result in roughly 60 credit hours if they take full advantage of the program. Students are eligible after their sophomore year to start in that summer and can take 2 courses each semester. There are two summer sessions in addition to the regular fall and spring school semesters. This means that if a student is academically driven, they can start their college or university education as a junior. For those families with funding limitations, a high school student can obtain an Associate’s Degree in the summer after they graduate from high school.

Every parent should be aware of this advantage. The economic distress and the mystery of what the politicians in Austin and Washington D.C. will dream up next, demands that we prepare today’s students who will have to pay for the debacle.

Clyde Brewer

US Department of Education-Part 1

 

I plan to write a series of articles that will use Department of Education (DOE) documents, and the myriad of information available. My mission will be to follow this Agency’s function to see how the United States went from having one of the best educational systems in the world to one that appears to me to be a total disaster when compared with Asia’s advancement in education over my lifetime. When you read the specific facts you can draw your own conclusions to decide if the Federal Government has caused or ignored the problem, or both.

My initial reaction after spending several hours of reading is that the DOE, that like most other Government Departments, primary mission is to brag about the accomplishments and support its government union employees. The DOE was created in 1867 when we had started the path to lead the world in creativity for the next 100 years. My concern is how did we lose our educational leadership?

Next I will provide a copy of “The Federal Role in Education” that summarizes an Overview, History, Mission and Staffing that is available on the DOE website. Finding this was a time-consuming process by design. Another unusual thing I found is that you have no way to pose written questions by “E” mail that can be done with other government agencies. I encourage you to print the next issue to help you follow the series. It contains the Overview, History, Mission and Staffing summary.

When you see the money they spend it seems simple to eliminate any department of the government that has accomplished nothing to improve our educational standings in the world or stopped its demise. Some one, some where, caused this problem. I doubt all 50 States, that are never in unison, are the cause!

If you have the same concerns help me obtain factual data to use in my articles.  CB

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