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Archive for the tag “no cell phones”

CHILDREN OF THE GREATEST GENERATION


My dear friend Peter Forrest shared this walk down memory lane that I will share with anyone who might never believe the early life we had. This recap is just a teaser when compared with things I can remember growing up. I was born in 1930 and have memories far beyond the things listed as others still alive could also share. I hope every one of the 47 people currently in my families keep a copy of this article and remember the changes that that happened most will never believe. The hardest thing my family and friends will find hard to believe Is trying to remember me having any connection to a “Silent” anything. I hope this creates some interest and questions, especially by my army of grandchildren before the “FAT LADY SINGS”. If anyone knows who wrote this please advise me so I can give them credits. Clyde Brewer

Born in the 1930s and early 40s, we exist as a very special age cohort. We are the Silent Generation.

We are the smallest number of children born since the early 1900s.  We are the “last ones.”

We are the last generation, climbing out of the depression, who can remember the winds of war and the impact of a world at war which rattled the structure of our daily lives for years.

We are the last to remember ration books for everythingfrom gas to sugar to shoes to stoves.

We saved tin foil and poured fat into tin cans.

We saw cars up on blocks because tires weren’t available.

We can remember milk being delivered to our house early in the morning and placed in the milk box on the porch.

We are the last to see the gold stars in the front windows of our grieving neighbors whose sons died in the War.

We saw the ‘boys’ home from the war, build their little houses.

We are the last generation who spent childhood without television; instead, we imagined what we heard on the radio.

As we all like to brag, with no TV, we spent our childhood “playing outside” .

We did play outside, and we did play on our own.

There was no little league.

There was no city playground for kids.

The lack of television in our early years meant, for most of us, that we had little real understanding of what the world was like.

On Saturday afternoons, the movies, gave us newsreels of the war sandwiched in between westerns and cartoons.

Telephones were one to a house, often shared (party Lines)and hung on the wall.

Computers were called calculators, they only added and were hand cranked; typewriters were driven by pounding fingers, throwing the carriage, and changing the ribbon.

The internet and GOOGLE were words that did not exist.

Newspapers and magazines were written for adults and the news was broadcast on our table radio in the evening by Gabriel Heatter.

We are the last group who had to find out for ourselves.

As we grew up, the country was exploding with growth.

The G.I. Bill gave returning veterans the means to get an education and spurred colleges to grow.

VA loans fanned a housing boom.

Pent up demand coupled with new installment payment plans put factories to work.

New highways would bring jobs and mobility.

The veterans joined civic clubs and became active in politics.

The radio network expanded from 3 stations to thousands of stations

Our parents were suddenly free from the confines of the depression and the war, and they threw themselves into exploring opportunities they had never imagined.

We weren’t neglected, but we weren’t today’s all-consuming family focus.

They were glad we played by ourselves until the street lights came on.

They were busy discovering the post war world.

We entered a world of overflowing plenty and opportunity; a world where we were welcomed.

We enjoyed a luxury; we felt secure in our future.

Depression poverty was deep rooted.

Polio was still a crippler.

The Korean War was a dark presage in the early 50s and by mid-decade school children were ducking under desks for Air-Raid training.

Russia built the Iron Curtain and China became Red China ..

Eisenhower sent the first ‘advisers’ to Vietnam.

Castro set up camp in Cuba and Khrushchev came to power.

We are the last generation to experience an interlude when there were no threats to our homeland.

We came of age in the 40s and 50s.  The war was over and the cold war, terrorism, global warming , and  perpetual economic insecurity had yet to haunt life with unease.

Only our generation can remember both a time of great war, and a time when our world was secure and full of bright promise and plenty. We have lived through both.

We grew up at the best possible time, a time when the world was getting better. not worse.

We are the Silent Generation. (most of us possibly?) CB

“The Last Ones”

More than 99 % of us are either retired or deceased, and we feel privileged to have”lived in the best of times”!

ANON

WE ARE AWESOME !!! 

To all of us Born 1925 – 1955:  

After a walk through history read a quote by Jay Leno.

First, we survived being born to mothers who may have smoked and/or drank while they were pregnant. 

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn’t get tested for diabetes. 

Then, after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs Covered with bright colored Lead-based paints. 

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, locks on doors or cabinets, And, when we rode our bikes, We had baseball caps, Not helmets, on our heads. 

As infants and children, we would ride in cars with no car seats, no booster seats, no seat belts, no air bags, bald tires and sometimes no brakes. 

Riding in the back of a pick- up truck on a warm day was always a special treat. 

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle. 

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle, and no one actually died from this. 

We ate cupcakes, white bread, real butter, and bacon. We drank Kool-Aid made with real white sugar.

And we weren’t overweight.

WHY? 

Because we were always outside playing…that’s why! 

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. 

No one was able to reach us all day. And, we were OKAY. 

We would spend hours building Our go-carts out of scraps and then ride them down the hill, Only to find out We forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned To Solve the problem. 

We did not Have Play Stations, Nintendo’s and X-boxes.

There were No video games, No 150 channels on cable, No video movies Or DVDs, No surround-sound or CDs, No cell phones, No personal computers, No Internet and No chat rooms. 

WE HAD FRIENDS 

And we went outside and found them!  We fell out of trees, got cut, Broke bones and Teeth, And there were No lawsuits  from those accidents.

We would get Spankings with wooden spoons, switches, ping-pong paddles, or just a bare hand and no one would call child services to report abuse.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, And The worms did Not live in us forever. 

 We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, 22 rifles for our 12th, rode horses, made up games with sticks and tennis balls, and although we were told it would happen – we did not put out very many eyes. 

We rode bikes or walked to a friend’s house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just Walked in and talked to them.

Little League had tryouts And not everyone Made the team.  Those who didn’t had to learn To deal with Disappointment. 

Imagine that!! The idea of a parent bailing us out If we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, Problem solvers, and Inventors ever. 

The past 60 to 85 years have seen an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, Failure, success, responsibility, and we learned How to deal with it all. 

If YOU are one of those born Between 1925-1955, CONGRATULATIONS! 

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up as kids before the lawyers and the government regulated so much of our lives for our own good. 

While you are at it, forward this to your kids, so they will know how brave and lucky their parents were. 

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn’t it? 

~~~~~~~ 

The quote of by Jay Leno: 

“With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to another, and with the threat of bird flu and terrorist attacks, are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?”

For those of you that prefer to think that we lived with just dumb luck go ahead and just delete this message. God was watching over those of us when we made our own choices and “We Survived“!    ANON

My friend Peter Forrest sent this walk through history that brought back many fond memories and pain of being born on August 31, 1930. I am certain my children have never believed many of the stories I shared but I had no reason to make up things like the only bone I ever broke was bowling. They would have never survived the Navy boot camp I endured at age 17. Fear of paying for pain I was one of few who spent nearly five years in the Navy and never got a tattoo. My thanks to Peter for making me at least feel “Awesome”!   C Brewer WOW, today is my 87th birthday too.

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