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Archive for the tag “U.S. Marines”

AN AMERICAN VETERAN STORY!

My great friend, Dr. Peter Forrest sent me the following article. This brought back memories only a veteran could possibly understand. This took me back to the day I asked my parents to allow me to join the Navy Reserve at 17 in 1947. Just think, how many American boys have died serving in the military, especially when this boy decided to give it a try so soon after WWII was over shortly after I was 15. I have never shared all of this with anyone. 

My real desire was to continue learning as the opportunity to attend college was not possible for me and there were no jobs for kids. It was still difficult for the veterans of WWII to find jobs and any hope of a scholarship at that time was for the veterans as it should have been. My hope to fulfill my desire to serve on active duty was answered and I was sworn in on March 15, 1948. I will not bore you with the pride I had at that moment or the details of my service as I was not involved IN the war in Korea that started not too long after I enlisted. I served some 42 months on active duty before I finished my reserve enlistment and was Honorably discharged on August 30, 1952. This was the day before my 22nd birthday. 
The greatest thing the service did for me was to make a man out of a boy, and fast. If Americans really wanted to re-establish discipline, pride respect in their children they would support mandatory military training for every boy and girl at 18 whether they graduated high school or not. There would not be gangs and violence we see today and the prisons might not be full of young people. Please enjoy this wonderful story.     
                                         A great article…………….
This is a well written article about a father who put several of his kids through expensive colleges but one son wanted to be a Marine. Interesting observation by this dad.  See below.  A very interesting commentary that says a lot about our society, By Frank Schaeffer of the Washington Post.
Before my son became a Marine, I never thought much about who was defending me. Now when I read of the war on terrorism or the coming conflict in Iraq, it cuts to my heart. When I see a picture of a member of our military who has been killed, I read his or her name very carefully. Sometimes I cry.
In 1999, when the barrel-chested Marine recruiter showed up in dress blues and bedazzled my son John, I did not stand in the way. John was headstrong, and he seemed to understand these stern, clean men with straight backs and flawless uniforms. I did not. I live in the Volvo-driving, higher education-worshiping North Shore of Boston. I write novels for a living. I have never served in the military.
It had been hard enough sending my two older children off to Georgetown and New York University. John’s enlisting was unexpected, so deeply unsettling. I did not relish the prospect of answering the question, “So where is John going to college?” from the parents who were itching to tell me all about how their son or daughter was going to Harvard. At the private high school John attended, no other students were going into the military.
“But aren’t the Marines terribly Southern?” asked one perplexed mother while standing next to me at the brunch following graduation. “What a waste, he was such a good student,” said another parent. One parent (a professor at a nearby and rather famous university) spoke up at a school meeting and suggested that the school should “ carefully evaluate what went wrong.”
When John graduated from three months of boot camp on Parris Island, 3000 parents and friends were on the parade deck stands. We parents and our Marines not only were of many races but also were representative of many economic classes. Many were poor. Some arrived crammed in the backs of pickups, others by bus. John told me that a lot of parents could not afford the trip.
We in the audience were white and Native American. We were Hispanic, Arab, and African American, and Asian. We were former Marines wearing the scars of battle, or at least baseball caps emblazoned with battles’ names. We were Southern whites from Nashville and skinheads from New Jersey, black kids from Cleveland wearing ghetto rags and white ex-cons with ham-hock forearms defaced by jailhouse tattoos. We would not have been mistaken for the educated and well-heeled parents gathered on the lawns of John’s private school a half-year before.
After graduation one new Marine told John, “Before I was a Marine, if I had ever seen you on my block I would’ve probably killed you just because you were standing there.” This was a serious statement from one of John’s good friends, a black ex-gang member from Detroit who, as John said, “would die for me now, just like I’d die for him.
My son has connected me to my country in a way that I was too selfish and insular to experience before. I feel closer to the waitress at our local diner than to some of my oldest friends. She has two sons in the Corps. They are facing the same dangers as my boy. When the guy who fixes my car asks me how John is doing, I know he means it. His younger brother is in the Navy.
Why were I and the other parents at my son’s private school so surprised by his choice? During World War II, the sons and daughters of the most powerful and educated families did their bit. If the idea of the immorality of the Vietnam War was the only reason those lucky enough to go to college dodged the draft, why did we not encourage our children to volunteer for military service once that war was done?
Have we wealthy and educated Americans all become pacifists? Is the world a safe place? Or have we just gotten used to having somebody else defend us? What is the future of our democracy when the sons and daughters of the janitors at our elite universities are far more likely to be put in harm’s way than are any of the students whose dorms their parents clean?
I feel shame because it took my son’s joining the Marine Corps to make me take notice of who is defending me. I feel hope because perhaps my son is part of a future “greatest generation. “As the storm clouds of war gather, at least I know that I can look the men and women in uniform in the eye. My son is one of them. He is the best I have to offer. He is my heart.
“Faith is not about everything turning out OK; Faith is about being OK no matter how things turn out.”
I know that the candy-ass, spoiled youth of today that have majored in demonstrations, violence and ignoring our laws will never know how proud the dad in this story had to have been. I have no doubt that if America were attacked today like it was in 1941 we would never be able to defend ourselves with the cowards that ran to Canada to avoid the Vietnam War. My brother, Lt. Col. James Brewer, served 24 years in the Army and was heckled, booed and threatened after he served two tours in that war that was fought for the Democrats and the banks. We have a similar event in Afghanistan that is a waste of life and trillions of dollars that will never change the way these people desire to live their lives.
To the young marine in the story my message is “SEMPER FI”. I have a shirt that best expresses my feelings. On the front over my heart it says “Veteran”. On the back above an American Flag it says, “I AM NOT A HERO”, below the flag it says, “I HAVE WALKED BESIDE A FEW”. My brother died at 55, an unhappy warrior who’s country turned there back on. He and my friend John Booker are just two of those “HERO’s” who I have been proud to have walked beside.   
 
GOD SAVE AMERICA, the Demoncrats  will give up. Comments please.   C Brewer

BENGHAZI FACTS

My friend Dr. Forrest sent me this letter. It is too realistic to be manufactured. I have no doubt we had people all around this area in support of clandestine operations at this time. CB

I know this lady, so I know it is the truth!

Andrew’s Story

Richard and I have just spent several days with our grandson, Andrew, who has just gotten out of the Marines. It was a wonderful visit…we had so much to catch up on…and Andrew’s time in the Marines was certainly part of it. He told us a story that I think all Americans should hear and I’m going to repeat it here for you. 

I’m not sure it’s really necessary, but I have removed his name just to be on the safe side.  He’s no longer in the military so probably it wouldn’t matter.  I did ask him if he’d get in trouble if I told the story and he said no.

Send it to as many as you want. As I said, sorry if I didn’t get the military jargon correct.

Our grandson has just gotten out of the Marines. He was deployed to Afghanistan for about 8 months, but the story I’m about to tell you is when he was stationed on a carrier off the coast of Libya.

During the Banghazi fiasco A’s ship was in Libyan waters just off the coast. (I’m not good at military terminology so forgive me if I get this part wrong).

A’s “squad” was about 128 men, divided into “platoons” of about a dozen men each, A was in charge of his platoon.  When it was known that the consulate was under siege, the entire squad was given combat ready orders. They were stationed, guns in hand, (his words) and sleeping at the foot of helicopters whose engines were running slowly (they do this so that the copter can move out more quickly) waiting to be deployed. 

If word had been given, they could have been in Banghazi in under 20 minutes….10 to board the helicopter, 10 to fly in! They could see Tripoli from the ship! Their mission: to secure the consulate…which means go in and remove all foreigners! He said there was no question that 128 Marines could have saved the lives of those 4 Americans, including an ambassador.   THEY WERE NEVER DEPLOYED!

I tell you this because now, when you hear your government tell you that no one could have been there in time to have saved those American lives you have heard a first-hand experience to the contrary.  Now you KNOW you have been lied to! 

Jeanne

We will never get the truth as our government has become so power obsessed they selectively decide what laws to enforce to entrench their power.  CB

AMERICAS FINEST

 

I hadn’t heard this story before but that isn’t surprising that the media wouldn’t go out of their way to give these Marines their due. 

It just makes me so damned proud. 

A chaplain, who happened to be assigned to the Pentagon, told of an  incident  that happened right after Flight 77 hit the Pentagon on 9/11.
 
A daycare facility inside the Pentagon had many children, including infants who were in heavy cribs. The daycare supervisor, looking at all the children they needed to evacuate, was in a panic over what they could do. There were many children, mostly toddlers, as well as the infants that would need to be taken out with the cribs.

There was no time to try to bundle them into carriers and strollers. Just then a young Marine came running into the center and asked what they needed. After hearing what the center director was trying to do, he ran back out into the hallway and disappeared. The director thought, “Well, here we are, on our own.”
 
About 2 minutes later, that Marine returned with 40 other Marines in tow. Each of them grabbed a crib with a child, and the rest started gathering up toddlers. The director and her staff then helped them take all the children out of the center and down toward the park near the Potomac and the Pentagon. Once they got about 3/4 of a mile outside the building, the Marines stopped in the park, and then did a fabulous thing- they formed a circle with the cribs, which were quite sturdy and heavy, like the covered wagons in the Old West. Inside this circle of cribs, they put the toddlers, to keep them from wandering off. 

Outside this circle were the 40 Marines, forming a perimeter around the children and waiting for instructions. There they remained until the parents could be notified and come get their children.The chaplain then said, “I don’t think any of us saw nor heard of this on any of the news stories of the day. It was an incredible story of our men there. There wasn’t a dry eye in the room. The thought of those Marines and what they did and how fast they reacted; could we expect any less from them? It was one of the most touching stories from the Pentagon.

Remember Ronald Reagan’s great compliment: “Most of us wonder if our lives made any difference. Marines don’t have that problem.” God Bless the USA , our troops, and you. It’s the Military, not the politicians that ensures our right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It’s the Military who salutes the flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag.

If you care to offer the smallest token of recognition and appreciation for the military, please pass this on and pray for our men and women, who have served and are currently serving our country, and pray for those who have given the ultimate sacrifice for freedom.

Thanks Ron

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